Destination Dreams continued

By Cynthia Hummel

Our ship, seen from our hotel window

Our ship, seen from our hotel window

Our route

Our route

October 1 – Thursday

We flew from Billings to Seattle to Portland.

A bloom in the Rose Test Garden of Portland, the “City of the Roses.”

A bloom in the Rose Test Garden of Portland, the “City of the Roses.”

Portland is Oregon’s largest city. With a population over 600,000 it is the 28th most populous city in the United States. Named after Portland, Maine. Portland is frequently recognized as one of the most environmentally conscious or “green” cities in the world because of its high walkability, large community of bicyclists, expansive network of public transportation options and 10,000+ acres of public parks.

Portland is located in the Willamette Valley region of the Pacific Northwest, between the Pacific Ocean and the Cascade Mountains, and its climate is marked by warm, dry summers and chilly, rainy winters. This climate is ideal for growing roses. For more than a century, Portland has been known as the “City of Roses”, with many rose gardens – most prominently the International Rose Test Garden. The city is also known for its abundant outdoor activities, liberal political values, and coffee and beer enthusiasm. Portland is home to the most total breweries and independent microbreweries of any city in the world, with 58 active breweries within city limits.

October 2 – Friday

Our plan for today was to explore Portland, which included a visit to the Rose Garden, a tour on the Hop-on-Hop-off bus, lunch in downtown and a walk along the waterfront near our hotel.

The International Rose Test Garden covers 4.5 acres (18,000 sq. m), has over 7,000 rose plants of approximately 550 varieties. The roses bloom from April through October with the peak coming in June, depending on the weather. New rose cultivars are continually sent to the garden from many parts of the world and are tested for color, fragrance, disease resistance and other attributes. It is the oldest continuously operating public rose test garden in the United States and exemplifies Portland’s nickname, “City of Roses.”

Its history goes back to 1917, when a group of Portland nurserymen came up with the idea for an American rose test garden. Portland had an enthusiastic group of volunteers and 20 miles (32 km) of rose bordered streets, largely from the 1905 Lewis & Clark Exposition. Portland was already dubbed “The City of Roses” so this was leveraged to enhance the reputation. The president of Portland’s Rose Society at the time, petitioned for the city to serve as a safe haven for hybrid roses grown in Europe during World War I. Rose lovers feared that these unique plants could be destroyed as a result of the war. Foreign hybridists sent roses for test from many countries and the garden was an immediate success. Today, Portland is the only North American city that can issue its awards to roses of merit throughout the world.

The middle of this bridge was lifted for us to pass under.

The middle of this bridge was lifted for us to pass under.

Bird activity around our ship at the mouth of the Columbia River

Bird activity around our ship at the mouth of the Columbia River

Destination Dreams continues …

Please comment below.
Note: This comment area does not accept images. If you want to post photos or other graphics with your comment, please send the visual materials to webmaster@yale62.org. Thanks.

Back to Yale ’62 Home